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You Hate Them and You Work With Them: 7 Co-Workers We All Have

Regardless of whether you work in a large high-rise corporate building, or in a small office with 20 people, there are at least seven types of co-workers every office has: The Critic, The Needy One, The Narcissist, The Jester, The Gossiper, The Do-Nothinger, and The Do-Everythinger.

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We can all relate to working with crazy office peeps at one point or another, but there are some personas that surpass the extreme and make us avoid them at all costs; these co-workers make unemployment appealing.

The Critic:

The Critic Pop Art

55% of workers have a co-worker who rips apart every minuscule task and project. If you’re a Gilmore Girls fan, then you may relate The Critic to Paris, who is the overbearingly hard-working woman who always believes her work surpasses others’ work. Paris Geller as The Critic

If you don’t watch Gilmore Girls, then we can’t be friends.

The Critic, such as Paris, will always make your work feel inferior to their work. They like to micromanage projects and team members, and they insist on doing all the finishing touches on projects.

The Needy One:

The Needy Co-Worker Pop Art Showing Off in a sports car

The Needy One is the co-worker who seeks approval from everyone and wants you to think they’re super cool and have a great life outside of work. These workers need everyone to like and respect them, perhaps because they are actually insecure. I don’t know, I’m just a marketer.

Chandler from Friends as the Needy One

The Needy One often steers the conversation towards them so they can talk about themselves. It’s not necessarily that The Needy Ones are narcissistic, which is discussed below, they just want to be friends with everyone.

So remember that The Needy One has good intentions – they’re like the wannabe cool kid. They may be annoying, but you can’t hate them for wanting to be your friend.

The Narcissist:

The-Narcissist-Pop-Art

While the needy co-worker diverts conversations to talk about them to make friends, The Narcissists divert conversations to talk about themselves because they actually only ever think about themselves.

The Narcissist like to praise their own good efforts and thrive in environments where accomplishments are publicly recognized. And if they are not in a workplace that publicizes their accomplishments, then they will make sure their accomplishments are known by diverting conversations back to them. They’ve perfected that cycle.

While The Narcissists are annoying to converse with, I would take the Narcissist over The Critic any day.

The Jester:

The Jester Pop Art

The Jester is similar to The Narcissist in that they think they are greatest. They think they are the funniest person in the world, or at least in the office, and try to host their comedy night show every day, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

I’m guilty of being the office jester. Except that I don’t think I’m funny, I know I’m funny!

I would know because I laugh at my jokes all the time…

The Gossiper:

 

Almost every office has an office-gossiper. The office-gossiper is pretty self-explanatory – they absorb all the floating secrets and slowly disperse them throughout the day.

The office gossip likes the attention of being the “know-all” co-worker, and they gossip to start conversations with people.

Remember to choose wisely when you decide to tell someone about the co-worker you got a little too close to at the last office party.

The Do-Nothinger:

The Do Nothinger Pop Art

Remember those “group” projects from grade school and college? Most groups had at least one person doing the majority of the work and one person doing none of the work.

Which one were you?

There’s a part of me that wishes I was the Do-Nothinger, but alas, I was the Do-Everythinger. The best way to sum up my feelings towards group projects was, “When I die, I want my group project members to lower me into my grave so they can let me down one last time.”

The Do-Nothinger somehow floats through work without ever working. They manage to convince the boss that they contributed to projects, even though you and your team members know better. The Do-Nothinger also tends to be a friendly co-worker, which makes it harder to stay mad them.

But is anyone actually going to rat on the Do-Nothinger? Probably not.

The Do-Everythinger:

The Hard Worker Pop Art

The opposite of The Do-Nothinger is The Do-Everythinger. This co-worker is like the cubicle/office mole person. They are always hunched over their computer and typing something (or nothing) or they’re looking over piles of paper. They always seem to be busy, or at least look busy.

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The Do-Everythinger makes the rest of us look bad, but it’s not like you can actually hate them for working… right?

Props to all the hard workers (or pretenders) for picking up the slack. We don’t actually remember your name since you’re always working, but you are much appreciated when the rest of us get to leave early for happy hour.

You Hate Them and You Work With Them_ 7 Co-Workers We All Have

 

Asian girl emoji holding her hand outReferences:

8 Types Of Co-Workers We All Have To Deal With

7 Types of coworkers we all have who are annoying AF

 

 

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About the Author:

Sophia Tinsley is XTech Staffing’s Marketing Specialist and writes career-advice related articles and content for the website. She also manages XTech’s social media platforms.Sophia recently graduated from Texas State University where she earned her BBA with a major in Marketing. She is the crazy cat lady of the office and the embodiment of Michael Scott – she always has wacky ideas.Sophia also writes her own fashion blog and creates movie trailers as hobbies. She thinks she’s unique, but likes all things “basic” (i.e. Starbucks). And if you’re a Game of Thrones fan, then you and Sophia with get along swimmingly.
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